Interview: PAYMON (Italian Black Metal)

In 2014 PAYMON returned from a twelve year slumber, and in August this year delivered Beyond Darkness I Fall.

Nine tracks of unholy black metal from northern Italy, listen to a sample below:

We have copies of Beyond Darkness I Fall in stock at the distro.

Interview with Lord Skarn, 9 October 2016

Between the demos and your first album in 2014 there have been years of silence. But you were only hidden and have posted a 2008 unreleased track. What was happening during those 12 years and why did you decide to return recently?

First of all, thanks for your interest in PAYMON. Now I try to explain you what happened in this years. PAYMON was born when I was a young boy in late 1995, my only thought was record some songs for my own pleasure and for give my music to listen to my friends.
Then, between 2004 and 2012, I was busy with other bands and with work. In 2013 Schattenkult Produktionen contacted me proposing a full lenght that became “Regno Occulto”. I want to clarify, PAYMON was never on hold, but I continued to create music (unreleased).

The new album is out only two years after Regno occulto. Do you feel a renewed energy to record and release?

Yes, shortly after “Regno Occulto” release I had a lot of ideas in my head , so I asked to my label if was available to work together again.

How important is it to have a supporting label?

It was very important, without Schattenkult I don’t believe that these two album would be released. For me is basic that my music like to my label as much as I like it.

Are you already preparing new material?

No, I release only a new song for an Italian compilation. Now I’m the singer of another band named ENTIRETY and we have just finished to record an album, so my energy and time were dedicated to this project. In future I will sure record new material for PAYMON.

How have the lyrics/themes of PAYMON changed (if they have!) since the demo times? Have you changed as a musician?

Well, I play Black metal, my lyrical theme was and will be always coherent with the philosophy of this genre, not about cars, girls and fashion… Musically I’m influenced by the same bands that I heard when I was younger, in fact I think “Beyond Darkness I Fall” is an old style album. Technically I only learned to play more instruments (obviously being PAYMON a one-man-band).

Looking at the old demo there are two figures, but has PAYMON musically always been only yourself, Lord Skarn?

Yes, PAYMON is always only myself! The cover art that you probably refer to, was only a picture taken during a nocturnal rite.

paymon-in-the-black-night

You pay tribute to BONE AWL and THORNIUM with covers on this album. Are there special reasons for these?

About THORNIUM, their song has a particular meaning for me and I wanted to include it in my album as cover. Instead about BONE AWL, I think that their song is so raw and genuine, right for PAYMON.

BONE AWL is an example of a band that formed in the period between your early demos and new recordings. What other bands during this time (approx. 2000-2010) have influenced or impressed you?

I was alway influenced by Norwegian Black metal (as it can be heard) but I listen to a lot of black metal bands, DARKTHRONE, BURZUM, BEHERIT, THORNIUM, MORTUARY DRAPE, MARDUK, etc… I like also other genres as Death metal and ambient music.

Final words are yours!

I hope who will listen to “Beyond Darkness I Fall” feel some emotions, this is my goal. PAYMON is an underground band and I haven’t particular ambitions, only to create feelings in listeners.
I want to thanks Schattenkult Produktionen for believing in me and surely you for the time you give me.
Beware “Dove c’è molta luce, l’ombra è più nera”! Worship Darkness!

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Salute worship week: 2009 Kaptain Interview with CP Zine

kaptain salute guitar

Ripping leads?? Flaws in the ‘lute? what are you saying??? I can outrip both Tipton and Downing together brother…watch out!! I honestly can’t play the guitar, never practice, can’t even tune it, dangerous ways!!

Full interview

In the distro we have both albums, Above the Law and The Underground, in stock and the two vinyl splits with Occvlta and Tangorodrim.

Salute worship week: 2009 Interview with Grind the World

salute-underground-band

Motor grind! Heavier for sure!!! The work ethic is – know you music, keep buying music, and write riffs that are horrid/sharp/nasty. We’ll never change or stop. SALUTE is an old Tanker!. Kaptain and I both write songs. I write alot separately and he brings shit to the table for us to jam out together with myself on the beaters. In the futue we will be writing songs in our room as a full band along with our drummer Jimmy Axe. Hes a rusher/shredder on the kit…sounds very punkish to me. Aggressive. Hes been laying down stuff for a while now. JUST YOU WAIT! GAS TANKS!

Full interview

In the distro we have both albums, Above the Law and The Underground, in stock and the two vinyl splits with Occvlta and Tangorodrim.

Salute worship week: 2010 Radio Interview with Swine

salute-swine-rickenburn

We recorded and posted this at the time, but that link is dead. Interview from 10 February 2010, a few days before their London headlining gig.

In the distro we have both albums, Above the Law and The Underground, in stock and the two vinyl splits with Occvlta and Tangorodrim.

Salute worship week: 2010 Nocturnal Cult interview

salute-swine-stiff-jawz

We’ve kinda always done both. If we ever demo songs, and they’re good enough, we usually keep them and then maybe record the rest of the album in a big chunk, if we have a load of songs ready to go. Then it’s just a matter of mixing it all together. This is what we did with The Underground. Above The Law was all one big psycho week of recording with a tonne of beer, which was great but pretty tiring!! But yeah, the new one is being recorded as we go. I’m more confident with the gear now to just record in small doses and to not worry about microphone placements and all that stuff. Although my goal is to eventually have an old reel to reel analogue studio set up. Need the cash though you see.

Full interview

In the distro we have both albums, Above the Law and The Underground, in stock and the two vinyl splits with Occvlta and Tangorodrim.

JFN / Jarl Flagg-Nidhögg / Hendrik Möbus interview excerpt (ABSURD)

absurd-band

After my final release from jail, I was dismayed at the progressive decline of Black Metal from the uncompromising counterculture it was in the early 1990’s to the subcultural entertainment it has – not entirely but in large parts! – become ever since. In particular the young generation of bands and fans that came to Black Metal not sooner but in the new millennium, they are like the antithesis of everything Black Metal set out to be, and stood for, when I was a teenager myself. Back in the days, Black Metal was detached from the Metal genre in all but name. Yes, of course, many of those who became disciples of Black Metal have started as fans of Metal in general, but Black Metal was indeed a cult that forbids worship at any other altar. As soon as you shed the sheep’s clothing and became a wolf, you looked back at the Metal scene in spite and hatred. This disdain was equally echoed from the other side. It was out of the question that, say, you’d have a festival where a Black Metal band would share the stage with bands from another genre. Alas, this attitude has profoundly changed. Now, Black Metal has become just one of many sub-genres of Heavy Metal and it’s perfectly acceptable for anyone to listen to Black Metal among others. That has led to the proliferation of political correctness in Black Metal too, because this new generation of fans – and bands alike – is thriving on entertainment only. They enjoy the “occult atmosphere” and “wicked show” live on stage, but they don’t crave to actually torch a church or strangle someone to death like it was for the Black Metal of old, when the borderline between “fantasy” and “reality” was blurry, and bands and fans alike attempted to tear the fabric of reality apart so their sinister fantasies could materialize in our world. Now Black Metal of our day and age might still wish to shock, even to offend, but hurt nobody for real. It’s alright to hate mankind but wrong to hate any particular group of men, for instance. It’s tolerable to blaspheme Jesus Christ but if you’d do the same to the Prophet Muhammad, you are a racist. In a nutshell, Black Metal became castrated and domesticated. Black Metal won’t hurt anyone. No one needs to suffer for Black Metal, either. It’s self-evident that Black Metal, to a considerable degree, has become a parody – nay, a travesty – of what it once was. With that in mind, I am like a living fossil that even though it belongs to Black Metal ought to be extinct already.

Interview excerpt from The Sinister Flame, Issue V: Aristocracy of Wolves (Summer 2016 e.v.)
This issue of The Sinister Flame, previous issues and many other zines are in stock now at the distro

the-sinister-flame-issue-5

To the beautiful sound of cracking skulls, The Sinister Flame proudly presents its fifth issue, further exploring the abyss with ABIGOR, MARE, MORDOR, NASTROND, HIEROPHANT’S DESCENT, Temple of Them, XANTOTOL and Jarl Flagg Nidhogg of Darker Than Black. Aside from interviews, the issue also includes review sections and a special article by Northern Heritage that focuses on the connection of nature and Black Metal. DEAD REPTILE SHRINE, SATANIC WARMASTER, MUSTA KAPPELI, PHLEGEIN and VORDR all discuss the relevance of natural surrounding to themselves and their artistic work.

the-sinister-flame-logo

MORDOR interview excerpt (Swiss Black Metal)

mordor-band

I think the beginning of my attraction for death was in my youth, when I really understood that each living being must be dead one day. The deep moment when you see that this person who was alive is now a corpse and you will never see him/her again, that nothing in this world is eternal but ephemeral with various degrees. The mind tries to forget its mortality with focus on future, projects, believes and the thought of death is often anaesthetized by routines, activities or survival necessities. But when you fully understand that one day you also will be just a corpse burned or devoured by insects, worms or other animals, that death has always the last word, then you have several possibilities to deal with this awareness…

Interview excerpt from The Sinister Flame, Issue V: Aristocracy of Wolves (Summer 2016 e.v.)
This issue of The Sinister Flame, previous issues and many other zines are in stock now at the distro

the-sinister-flame-issue-5

To the beautiful sound of cracking skulls, The Sinister Flame proudly presents its fifth issue, further exploring the abyss with ABIGOR, MARE, MORDOR, NASTROND, HIEROPHANT’S DESCENT, Temple of Them, XANTOTOL and Jarl Flagg Nidhogg of Darker Than Black. Aside from interviews, the issue also includes review sections and a special article by Northern Heritage that focuses on the connection of nature and Black Metal. DEAD REPTILE SHRINE, SATANIC WARMASTER, MUSTA KAPPELI, PHLEGEIN and VORDR all discuss the relevance of natural surrounding to themselves and their artistic work.

the-sinister-flame-logo

HIEROPHANT’S DESCENT interview excerpt (Greek Black Metal)

hierophants-descent-band

In the emptiness of the Americanized civilization of the West we live in, every thinking individual who respects oneself is obliged to fight for his self-advancement on all fronts. The words of Heraclitus – the Pre-Socratic philosopher – are here to show us the way; «Τα παντα ρει» / Everything flows, everything is changing. You cannot remain the same in a world that is constantly changing. Life is full of challenges but you must be awake in order to perceive the messages and be able to learn from your own faults. Self-development in body and soul is necessary if you desire to reach the Faustian spirit and conquer your destiny.

Interview excerpt from The Sinister Flame, Issue V: Aristocracy of Wolves (Summer 2016 e.v.)
This issue of The Sinister Flame, previous issues and many other zines are in stock now at the distro

the-sinister-flame-issue-5

To the beautiful sound of cracking skulls, The Sinister Flame proudly presents its fifth issue, further exploring the abyss with ABIGOR, MARE, MORDOR, NASTROND, HIEROPHANT’S DESCENT, Temple of Them, XANTOTOL and Jarl Flagg Nidhogg of Darker Than Black. Aside from interviews, the issue also includes review sections and a special article by Northern Heritage that focuses on the connection of nature and Black Metal. DEAD REPTILE SHRINE, SATANIC WARMASTER, MUSTA KAPPELI, PHLEGEIN and VORDR all discuss the relevance of natural surrounding to themselves and their artistic work.

the-sinister-flame-logo

XANTOTOL interview excerpt (Polish Black Metal)

xantotol-band

At the time it was clear for me that Black metal means Satanism and there is no Black metal without the cult of Satan. I thought that all Black Metal bands are serious and going deeply into Satanic philosophy would be something normal and not unique. Around 1993 I realized that most Black Metal bands are just quasi Black metal and there is no real Satanic philosophy inside their music. I was disappointed. I remembered the words of Faustus Scorpius from Order of the Left Hand Path that Satanism isn’t inverse Christianity but I realized that only a few Black Metal musicians understood those words in a correct way. The rest just made music which sounds like Black Metal but wasn’t Black Metal. Most of them have a Black Metal star status now and this is very sad.

Interview excerpt from The Sinister Flame, Issue V: Aristocracy of Wolves (Summer 2016 e.v.)
This issue of The Sinister Flame, previous issues and many other zines are in stock now at the distro

the-sinister-flame-issue-5

To the beautiful sound of cracking skulls, The Sinister Flame proudly presents its fifth issue, further exploring the abyss with ABIGOR, MARE, MORDOR, NASTROND, HIEROPHANT’S DESCENT, Temple of Them, XANTOTOL and Jarl Flagg Nidhogg of Darker Than Black. Aside from interviews, the issue also includes review sections and a special article by Northern Heritage that focuses on the connection of nature and Black Metal. DEAD REPTILE SHRINE, SATANIC WARMASTER, MUSTA KAPPELI, PHLEGEIN and VORDR all discuss the relevance of natural surrounding to themselves and their artistic work.

the-sinister-flame-logo

MARE interview excerpt (Norwegian Black Metal)

mare-band-2016

I certainly believe that Black Metal still has the power to change people’s lives, but not the seeking teenagers as in the 90’s. BM does not have the shocking wind of burning churches and pissing on Mary statues anymore. It takes a far more intelligent man to understand real Black Metal nowadays. One has to know how to navigate through the teeming masses of BM clowns and pseudo-intellectual bands and grasp for the right star.

Interview excerpt from The Sinister Flame, Issue V: Aristocracy of Wolves (Summer 2016 e.v.)
This issue of The Sinister Flame, previous issues and many other zines are in stock now at the distro

the-sinister-flame-issue-5

To the beautiful sound of cracking skulls, The Sinister Flame proudly presents its fifth issue, further exploring the abyss with ABIGOR, MARE, MORDOR, NASTROND, HIEROPHANT’S DESCENT, Temple of Them, XANTOTOL and Jarl Flagg Nidhogg of Darker Than Black. Aside from interviews, the issue also includes review sections and a special article by Northern Heritage that focuses on the connection of nature and Black Metal. DEAD REPTILE SHRINE, SATANIC WARMASTER, MUSTA KAPPELI, PHLEGEIN and VORDR all discuss the relevance of natural surrounding to themselves and their artistic work.

the-sinister-flame-logo